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SAT&SUN: 12pm - 6pm

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325 NW Couch St. Portland, OR 97209

325 NW Couch St. Portland, OR 97209

MON-FRI: 10am - 6pm
SAT&SUN: 12pm - 6pm

型染 : Katazome
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型染 : Katazome

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Katazome is a Japanese stencil dyeing technique. It uses a paste-resist process and is used to dye both cloth and paper. Katazome incorporates elements of printmaking and painting, and relies on simple natural materials - paper, rice paste and soymilk.

  

Main image: Animal Katazome, photo credit, Akemi Nakano Cohn, www.akemistudio.com

 

 

To create a katazome print, the design is cut into a piece of hand-made mulberry paper called shibugami. The paper is soaked with persimmon tannin to make it waterproof.

Rice paste is pushed through the cut areas of the shibugami. This paste makes these areas of the design resist dye, and is flexible so does not crack on the fabric. After the fabric is submerged in the dye bath and dried, the rice paste is washed away, revealing the bold design. Katazome is essentially an early prototype for what we know today as screen printing.

 

 

 

Traditional katazome designs often feature natural motifs, including flowers and birds. Katazome means "repeat dying", repeat referring to the repetitive pattern made possible by the stencils. Since the stencil only had to be made once, this made it easier to apply patterns to large amounts of fabric. The detailed designs were popular in both casual and formal wear, and was accessible for all classes of people. 

 

The rice paste could also be hand-applied for larger designs, which would be delicate as a paper stencil, or designs that would only be done once. Applying the rice paste directly to the fabric is a technique called Tsutsugaki

The following images are vintage Katazome fabrics and stencils from our collection.

 

 


Karakusa (arabesque) motif, a symbol for eternity or a family legacy

 


Kiku (Chrysanthemum), The national flower of Japan, and a symbol for the imperial family

 


Plovers, a small bird symbolizing strength and determination

 


The Tortoise and pine trees are both symbols for longevity (Tsutsugaki)

 


Kiku (Chrysanthemum)

 


Kiku (Chrysanthemum)

 


Vintage Katazome Stencil with Matsuba (pine needle) motif

 

 


Vintage Katazome Stencil with multipattern geometric florals

 

 


Vintage Katazome stencil with mock kasuri design

 

 


Vintage Katazome stencil with Asanoha motif